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learn about cbd

Learn about cbd

The most common forms of CBD are oils, sprays and vapes. It’s also available as a topical cream or muscle balm. But we’ve seen CBD pop up pretty much everywhere, from tea bags to cosmetics and even popcorn.

There’s very little evidence for the impact of CBD on animals, but feeding it to your pet could be dangerous. Many CBD oils have traces of THC, which is highly toxic for cats and dogs.

Current clinical trails mostly apply to higher-dose medical-grade CBD; it’s not yet known if the concentration of commercial products is too low to have an effect.

Can anyone not take CBD?

Here, we answer some common questions to help you understand the facts behind the hype and headlines.

CBD – short for cannabidiol – is a chemical compound extracted from the cannabis plant. It’s thought to affect our cell- signalling system (the endocannabinoid system), which helps to regulate functions such as sleep, immune response and pain. This explains CBD’s potentially wide-ranging application.

The Home Office says it’s legal to grow industrial hemp containing up to 0.2% THC, with a licence.

What about CBD for pets?

Watch our quick video guide to CBD for a rundown of what its all about.

CBD is anecdotally popular for conditions such as anxiety, chronic pain and insomnia.

These policies vary widely. Marijuana and CBD are currently fully legal for both medicinal and recreational purposes in Alaska, California, Colorado, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, Nevada, Oregon, Vermont, Washington, and Washington D.C. In 23 states, it's legal in some form, such as for medicinal purposes. Another 14 states permit just CBD oil. But both are illegal in Idaho, Nebraska, and South Dakota. For more information, the organization Americans for Safe Access has a helpful guide to the specific laws in each state.

But the challenge when considering CBD products for pets is the same as with people: lack of research. "I believe there are good products out there today, but I also don't know how to distinguish them at this time," Faught says.

But even though it's infiltrating pretty much every corner of the wellness world (hi, vegan CBD brownies!) many people still find CBD a little confusing—especially when it comes to figuring out the right way to use it and how to make sure the stuff you're buying is, you know, actually legit. Below, we asked experts to answer the most pressing questions about CBD.

This is a confusing one for many people. "A lot of brands don't do a good job of clearly instructing their consumer on the dosing," says Chris Roth, CEO and co-founder of Highline Wellness. When thinking about dosing, also consider whether your CBD is full-spectrum or isolate: Full-spectrum could include other cannabinoids like cannabidivarin or cannabigerol (this is important, since "there's something called the 'entourage effect' when all together, they're more effective than any one of them alone," Roth explains), while isolate is 100% CBD. "Some people might only need 10 milligrams of full-spectrum CBD, but with isolate, even taking 80 or 100 milligrams might not have the same effect," he says.

That all sounds good, but is it legal?

Nope. The cannabis plant is made up of two main players: CBD and THC. "CBD is the non-psychoactive portion of the plant, so what that means is you won't have any effects like euphoria," says Junella Chin, DO, an osteopathic physician and a medical cannabis expert for cannabisMD. "You won't feel sedated or altered in any way."

"There are literally hundreds of CBD brands at this point," says Brandon Beatty, founder and CEO of Bluebird Botanicals and an executive vice president of the U.S. Hemp Roundtable. Here are a few things you should keep in mind when shopping.

It should not, as long as you're buying third-party tested CBD with no added THC, says Dr. Chin. But she does point out that athletes, who often are required to take drug tests that are more sensitive, "could potentially test positive" for trace amounts of THC if they've been using CBD products.

Will CBD show up on a drug test?

We don't mean the color or millennial font. If it's a dietary supplement, it should have a back panel with an FDA disclaimer and warning section, according to Beatty. "Ideally, it would be preferable to have access to their third-party lab testing results too."

When people talk about hemp oil, they're referring to oil extracted from the seeds of the hemp plant. There are no cannabinoids—CBD or THC—in hemp oil. This ingredient is packed with healthy fats and often appears in beauty products for its moisturizing benefits.