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is cbd legal in south carolina

Is cbd legal in south carolina

If you’re don’t live anywhere near a physical retail store, there are plenty of online delta-8 vendors ready to ship to your address in South Carolina. You can buy the most popular delta-8 THC products online. If you’re looking to buy edibles, see this list of the best delta-8 THC gummies for potent edibles.

Yes. You can travel to South Carolina with hemp-derived delta-8 products in your possession. State and federal law allow cross-border transport and travel of hemp and hemp-derived compounds, including delta-8.

Buying delta-8 THC in South Carolina

Yes. Like delta-8, hemp-derived delta-10 THC is legal in the state of South Carolina. For the delta-10 products to be legal and protected under state law, they must be sourced from hemp carrying no more than 0.3% THC as outlined in the federal 2018 Farm Bill.

Is CBD derived from marijuana legal in South Carolina?

What type of delta-8 is legal in South Carolina?

The DEA issued an Interim Final Rule (IFR) in mid-2020 addressing the legal status of synthetically-derived cannabinoids. What does “synthetically derived” have to do with delta-8? Well, delta-8 is a minor cannabinoid, meaning hemp plants only carry up to 1%.

Hemp is a labor-intensive crop. The estimated input cost to grow hemp is between $10,000 and $15,000 per acre. This cost includes labor, seed, and transplants or clones.

Hemp and marijuana come from the same plant species, Cannabis sativa, but they differ in concentrations of THC. Legally, THC levels determine whether the substance is considered an agricultural product or a regulated drug. Federal and South Carolina law define hemp as any part of the plant with a THC concentration that does not exceed 0.3 percent on a dried weight basis. Anything above that is considered marijuana and is illegal in the state.

No. A hemp farming permit does not allow a farmer/grower to process their own hemp or another farmer’s hemp. A separate processing permit is required and is a part of the South Carolina State Plan.

FARMING HEMP

Hemp is a variety of the plant Cannabis sativa that is low in the chemical THC. Here’s the definition under South Carolina state law: ‘Hemp’ or ‘industrial hemp’ means the plant Cannabis sativa L. and any part of that plant, including the non-sterilized seeds thereof and all derivatives, extracts, cannabinoids, isomers, acids, salts, and salts of isomers, whether growing or not, with the federally defined THC level for hemp.

Tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, is a naturally occurring chemical responsible for many of marijuana’s psychoactive effects.

Hemp is a plant and CBD is a compound. Hemp is not CBD. “Partially processed” hemp is not CBD, either. Even “full spectrum” hemp extracts suspended in a carrier oil are more akin to hemp than pure CBD since they contain an array of phytonutrients. Although such extracts include CBD, they cannot in any reasonable sense be called CBD. We are aware that there may be some products on the market that add CBD to a food or label CBD as a dietary supplement. Under federal law, it is currently illegal to market CBD this way. More information can be found in our Hemp Products in Human Food Quick Guide.

3. What is THC?

Permitted hemp farmers who wish to sell hemp plants, clones or transplants to other permitted farmers or out of state must obtain a Live Plant Certification from Clemson University. For licensing information, please visit Clemson’s Nursery and Dealer Licensing page or contact Nursery Programs Coordinator Negar Edwards at 864-646-2126 or [email protected]

Separate fees and permit requirements apply. More information about the Hemp Handler Permit is available here.