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is cbd a controlled substance in canada

Is cbd a controlled substance in canada

"Right now there's an opportunity to sell this product and sell a lot of it, and because we don't have a lot of evidence [to back up health claims], marketing fills that gap," said Busse.

It is also illegal to make any health or cosmetic claims about CBD products in Canada. To make a health claim, the product requires approval as a prescription drug under the Food and Drugs Act. No CBD products in Canada have that approval.

'We've got very little evidence'

CBD products sold on the black market don't undergo the same rigorous standards of testing that licensed CBD products go through.

In Canada, any CBD products marketed for pets are illegal and veterinarians are prevented from prescribing it.

The Truth About CBD

A CBC Marketplace investigation has found hundreds of illegal CBD products for sale in a thriving Canadian black market. Going undercover, we found products are easily available and salespeople are willing to make extravagant and illicit health claims.

Although it may not have more than 0.3% THC, there is no limit to the amount of CBD that may be contained in industrial hemp plants.

The Act and accompanying regulations place strict controls on cannabis:

All phytocannabinoids are regulated under the new Cannabis Act. The Act came into force on October 17, 2018.

Industrial hemp

CBD and products containing CBD are subject to all of the rules and requirements that apply to cannabis under the Cannabis Act and its regulations.

The cannabis plant contains hundreds of chemical substances. Over 100 of these are known as cannabinoids. Cannabinoids derived from cannabis plants are sometimes called phytocannabinoids.

Growing cannabis plants containing CBD for commercial sale

Under the Cannabis Act, CBD products remain strictly regulated and are only legal when sold in compliance with the Act and its regulations.

Movement of cannabis and cannabis products between countries is covered by 3 United Nations drug conventions, including the Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs of 1961 as amended by the 1972 Protocol.