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full or broad spectrum cbd oil

Full or broad spectrum cbd oil

The interactions between various cannabinoids, terpenes, and flavonoids are complex; it will take decades of research to parse them. Fortunately, terpenes and flavonoids have at least as much scientific research behind them as ahead of them. They are already common additives in many commercial processed goods, especially cosmetics, and of course, food – plants make tens of thousands of different terpenes alone. They can also be synthesized.

By contrast, distillates and isolates offer consistency and standardization; they are a known quantity. With them, a product producers can use a wider variety of flavorings to make the formulation really shine, and they are far more consistent in emulsions (as long as the supplier is reliable). The consumer can also expect the same effects and sensory experience every time.

The Entourage Effect

The definition of the Entourage Effect is relatively simple; it is the theory that cannabinoids have more favorable actions when delivered with a higher proportion of native phytochemicals such as terpenes , flavonoids, and other cannabinoids. This manifests as both amplification of positive effects (efficacy) and modulation of undesirable ones (tolerability). The term was coined in 1988 by Raphael Mechoulam, the same Israeli scientist who discovered THC, and its potential mechanisms were first illuminated by Dr. Ethan Russo in his landmark 2011 paper, “Taming THC.” Put even more simply, the Entourage Effect is a way of saying that, when it comes to cannabis and hemp, the whole is greater than the sum of the parts.

Isolate

Full Spectrum CBD means the maximum amount of helpful native phytochemicals are retained during extraction, including THC. The goal is to remove extraneous lipids while retaining an identical ratio of cannabinoids, terpenes, and flavonoids from the original plant source material. This can only be verified by testing the material before and after the extraction. True Full Spectrum extracts are rarer than one might expect; most extractions lose significant terpenes and flavonoids during processing because they are much more volatile than cannabinoids. Ethanol and very low heat (the RSO method or whole plant oil), or an extremely long vacuum extraction process can yield Full Spectrum extracts. Full Spectrum extracts tend to be quite dark in color, and their flavors can be described as earthy and vegetal.

We have the option to have CBD products containing the legal limit of THC. There is nothing wrong with this, however we don’t feel comfortable misusing the term “less than 0.3% THC” because the majority of individuals who use CBD do not want to consume THC.

THC-Free simply means a product or extract that contains non-detectable levels of THC. There is a difference between non-detectable and zero THC or 0% THC because it’s impossible in a botanical extract; hence, the accurate term being THC-Free.

In order to verify a company has terpenes in their extracts one must ask for a third-party lab test which a lab that is fully licensed by the state and is unbiased, unrelated to the company in anyway. Look for the terpene profile content and if it shows “ND,” meaning non-detectable, then it does not contain it at all or contains nothing close to what it needs to be for the added therapeutic benefits terpenes brings.

What is THC-Free in Broad Spectrum?

Understanding the difference between Full Spectrum and Broad-Spectrum Extracts is quite simple. The difference among them is the level of Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) that is in the extracted CBD. Although there isn’t a huge difference, the main difference is that Full Spectrum contains 0.3% THC while Broad Spectrum contains non-detectable levels of THC also known as “THC Free” CBD oil.

THC does have added benefits but we would like our customers to have the option of having no THC. If THC is something you are looking for in your CBD, there are options available to you at local stores.

Broad Spectrum Extract CBD Oil

Something to note about Full Spectrum and Broad Spectrum, is that they should contain a “spectrum” of minor cannabinoids, and more importantly terpenes. Although many CBD companies emphasize how their products contain terpenes because it’s “Full Spectrum” or “Broad Spectrum,” it is actually not always true. Click this link to read about what terpenes are and their benefits.

Some other reasons that we push for THC-Free only products: