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cbd oil treatment for lung cancer

“This is one of many such promising single case reports of medical cannabis self-treatment for various cancers,” said David Nutt, DM, FRCP, FRCPsych, the Edmond J. Safra Chair in Neuropsychopharmacology, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. “Such case reports are biologically credible given the adaptogenic nature of the endocannabinoid system.”

After an initial CT scan, she underwent a CT-guided lung biopsy and was diagnosed with NSCLC (TNM stage T2bN0Mx). Further analysis of the tumor tissue showed that it was negative for ALK and EGFR mutations. PDL1 was expressed by <1% of the tumor cells. No distant metastases were detected.

Patient Declined Recommended Treatment

“Case reports cannot be considered to be reliable evidence, and there are currently no data from rigorous clinical trials to suggest that cannabis products will alter the natural history of any cancer,” Ernst said.

The patient was referred to cardiothoracic surgeons for a possible lobectomy, but the patient declined to have surgery. She was then referred to the oncologists. She underwent repeat CT and positron-emission tomography (PET) scans, which showed that her cancer had continued to shrink. On CT, there was an 11-mm reduction, and on PET, an 18-mm reduction. The left apical nodule had resolved, and the right upper lobe nodule was reduced in size.

The patient was an 80-year-old woman.

Cbd oil treatment for lung cancer

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“Without the knowledge of her clinicians, she chose to self-administer ‘cannabidiol (CBD) oil’ orally 2-3 times daily,” the doctors wrote in the paper.

In the paper, doctors at the Respiratory Department, at Watford General Hospital in the UK wrote that the woman was diagnosed with non-small cell lung cancer in 2018 and her tumour was 41 mm in size.

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The woman told doctors that the supplier advised that hot food or drinks should be avoided when taking the oil as she might otherwise feel stoned. The woman said she had reduced appetite since taking the oil but had no other obvious ‘side effects’. There were no other changes to her prescribed meds, diet, or lifestyle. And she continued to smoke throughout.

A lung cancer patient in her 80s, who rejected conventional treatment and self-medicated with cannabidiol (‘CBD’) oil saw her tumour shrink, said doctors in a study published in the journal in BMJ Case Reports. The case suggests the need to explore the use of cannabidiol (‘CBD’) oil as a potential lung cancer treatment. In the paper, doctors at the Respiratory Department, at Watford General Hospital in the UK wrote that the woman was diagnosed with non-small cell lung cancer in 2018 and her tumour was 41 mm in size. In addition, the woman was a chain smoker, and also had mild chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), osteoarthritis, and high blood pressure, for which she was taking various drugs.

Professor David Nutt, The Edmond J Safra Chair in Neuropsychopharmacology at Imperial College London, told the Science Media Centre (SMC) that the example is “one of many such promising single case reports of medical cannabis self-treatment for various cancers,” but added: “A case report itself is not sufficient to give any form of proof that one thing caused the other—we need trials for that.”

The woman, a 68-pack-a-year smoker, was offered treatment for her cancer including surgery and radiotherapy, but she declined both, so doctors decided to simply watch and wait by carrying out regular scans.

Meanwhile, scientists not involved in the case report have said that while the case appears encouraging, it should be taken with caution.

Scientists have advised caution after a report emerged of a woman whose lung cancer tumor shrank after she took regular doses of CBD oil.

According to the case report, regular CT scans over the following two-and-a-half years showed that her lung tumor appeared to be shrinking over time, despite the fact that the woman was continuing to smoke and was not receiving any conventional treatment.

It also notes that previous studies have “failed to agree on the usefulness of cannabinoids as a cancer treatment.”

A case report was published in the British Medical Journal on October 14 involving a woman in her 80s who was diagnosed with lung cancer in 2018 after she went to doctors with a persistent cough.

“This type of product is very different to most CBD oils which predominantly contain CBD,” Dr. Tom Freeman, senior lecturer and director of the Addiction and Mental Health Group at the University of Bath, told SMC.

The woman was taking 0.5 milliliters of the oil two to three times per day by ingesting it. The case report authors note that the oil “appears to have had a positive effect on her disease” but couldn’t conclusively confirm this.