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cbd genital herpes

Cbd genital herpes

CBD works in the body by interacting with the endocannabinoid system (ECS). According to Dr. Dustin Sulak of the American Academy of Cannabinoid Medicine, “the ECS is the most important physiological system involved in establishing and maintaining human health.” The ECS has its receptors throughout the body; they occur in virtually every system and organ, including the cells of the immune system (3)

Do’s and Don’ts of Using CBD for Herpes

People who often contact the herpes simplex virus are unaware that they have it. That’s because the virus stays in its inactive form most of the time. Below you’ll find the symptoms that individuals with herpes may experience (1):

How do You Get Herpes?

These cannabinoids, in combination with terpenes, contribute to the entourage effect, or the whole-plant synergy. This concept describes synergistic effects between all naturally occurring compounds in hemp. Researchers investigating the entourage effect have concluded that cannabinoids and terpenes are more effective together than in isolation — providing higher overall potency of hemp extracts and more predictable dosing.

Cannabis – a word that stirs a lot of discussion and debate. But when we come to think of it, it is just an herb, a plant that has been used for medicinal, religious, and trading purposes for decades. However, despite its historical merits, it is still considered controversial. Due to its psychotropic effects, it was declared illegal in the 17th century US.

Since those discoveries were made, more and more studies emphasizing the therapeutic effects of cannabis have been conducted. These boosted the popularity of CBD oil, a component of cannabis that does not have the same hallucinogenic and mind-altering effect as the whole plant. Today, following the legalization of some states, CBD is slowly making its way to the mainstream pharmacological world.

Fortunately, a series of major discoveries about the plant and its connection to the human body prevailed. In 1964, scientists from Israel were able to identify and synthesize the cannabinoid tetrahydocannabinol (THC). Soon after, other cannabinoids were identified including cannabidiol (CBD). Another milestone achieved was in 1988, when scientists determined that the mammalian brain has receptor sites that respond pharmacologically to cannabinoids. These cannabinoid receptors comprise the endocannabinoid system (ECS), a network of specialized protein molecules embedded in cell membranes that affect various homeostatic functions