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cbd edibles get you high

CBD edibles may help balance out a psychotropic THC.

A 2006 study published in the Brazilian Journal of Medical and Biological Research concluded that CBD was safe at a wide range of doses in both healthy and epileptic study participants.

When you inhale CBD via a vape pen or through smoke, it can be very difficult to determine exactly how much CBD you are getting each time.

8. CBD edibles are easy to dose

No vape break required.

However, the word cannabis is often used when discussing varieties of the plant capable of producing psychoactive THC.

Researchers are investigating different ways to use CBD in medicine.

10. CBD is well-tolerated with minimal side effects

While edibles tend to take a while to kick in, consuming a little CBD with your THC is a great way to moderate the psychoactive experience.

Many purchased CBD edibles come in pre-dosed servings, enabling you to calculate how much CBD you have consumed and how much you need to consume to achieve your desired results.

“The emerging UK CBD industry, inspired by the successes of the legal cannabis industry in the USA, has adopted a similar marketing strategy, and whilst the Medicines and Healthcare Regulatory Agency rules mean products can’t make direct health claims without going through formal licensing, the language of ‘wellbeing’ allows them to bypass regulation.

Coffees and cakes may contain between 5–10mg of CBD. But clinical trials administer doses of around 100–1,500mg per day, with medical supervison.

"There is a greater public awareness of the potential therapeutic uses of medical cannabis and cannabinoids such as CBD, particularly in light of the UK government decision to permit some cannabis prescriptions in response to high-profile campaigns by the families of children affected by severe epilepsy," says Professor Sumnall.

"But there is no good scientific evidence that these consumer products have any real benefits.

"Many of the CBD products available on the high street contain so little CBD that you would need to consume vast quantities to even approach some of the doses that are administered in clinical trials of medicines", concludes Sumnall.

“CBD tends to work well in foods with a stronger, earthy taste, such as chocolate and coffee”, says Meg Greenacre, head chef at Erpingham House in Norwich. "I’ve been inspired by menus in London to create a delicious CBD brownie for our customers here. I was surprised that during taste tests, no one could tell which brownie the CBD was in and actually, most people thought it was the batch that did not contain it. I am looking into adding CBD to more sweet bakes such as nutty flapjacks and beetroot chocolate cake , which naturally have a deeper and richer flavour, complementing the earthy, almost bitter, taste and smell of CBD oil.

However, it is not clear whether it would be advisable to consume higher doses of CBD than is currently in these products. “I do worry that if people believe a small amount is good and it’s completely safe, they may believe a large amount is better, says Dr Sarah Jarvis, GP and Clinical Director of Patient Info."

Is CBD a miracle cure?

"CBD is actually hard to cook with. It has a disgusting taste", says Greg Hanger, head chef at Kalifornia Kitchen in London, who has created an entire CBD afternoon tea . Greg pays attention to the type of oil that the CBD is mixed with, saying "coconut oil CBD is great in Thai cooking balanced with coriander, ginger and lime. Olive oil CBD is great for Middle Eastern foods like hummus or you could even mask the flavour with rosemary and put it in cheesy sauce or mashed potatoes ."

“Businesses have picked up on growing public awareness and have been promoting their products online, in high-street retailers and increasingly in food and drink,” says Professor in Substance Use, Harry Sumnall, Liverpool John Moores University. We spoke to chefs at two restaurants who use CBD on their menus in completely different ways.