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cbd dosage for generalized anxiety

Cbd dosage for generalized anxiety

If you were to plot this result on graph paper, it would form a bell, with 100 and 900 on the ends. Hence, the name of this pharmacology concept literally takes shape.

Proponents of cannabidiol (CBD) oil claim that it can help treat many conditions. These include: acne, anorexia, anxiety, chronic pain, depression, drug addiction and withdrawal, epilepsy, glaucoma, high blood pressure, insomnia, muscle spasms, and Parkinson's disease. In addition, CBD may help treat anxiety disorders like panic disorder, social anxiety disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and generalized anxiety. There is little research to support many of these uses, however.

Many people are taking CBD oil to treat anxiety. Research shows it may be helpful for some types of anxiety disorders but not others. And the potential for wide-ranging side effects is very real.

Is CBD Legal?

Consumers should know that CBD oil may be labeled incorrectly because it is mostly unregulated. In fact, a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that nearly 70% of all CBD products sold online are mislabeled.

Cannabidiol is unlike tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). This other cannabis compound produces a “high.” CBD oil typically doesn’t contain THC, so it doesn’t have this effect.

A Word From Verywell

Similarly, CBD showed no effect on systolic blood pressure (the top number in a blood pressure reading) or persecutory ideation. This is a fear that someone is harming you or will in the future.

A small study published in Neuropsychopharmacology determined that CBD may help reduce social anxiety. The ADAA defines this disorder as "intense anxiety or fear of being judged, negatively evaluated, or rejected in a social or performance situation."

One report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) indicated that a number of people experienced negative unwanted side effects due to CBD products that contained synthetic CBD, although the products were not labeled as containing such ingredients.

Starting at a lower dose and working your way up to the amount you need may be the best ways to avoid taking too much.

Verywell / Madelyn Goodnight

A 2019 comprehensive review published in The Lancet Psychiatry looked at previously published studies. The review ultimately concluded that there was little evidence to support the use of CBD for mental health purposes and suggested that more research is needed in order to substantiate its use to treat symptoms of conditions such as anxiety, depression, and insomnia.

Safety

While its effectiveness is still up for debate, one 2017 review found that it was a relatively safe option.   While it is important to remember that there is still a great deal we don't yet know about CBD and its effects, it is something that you might opt to try to see if you experience any benefits.

However, it’s important to remember that research is still in its infancy and experts do not yet fully understand the potential long-term impacts of CBD usage. For that reason, you should always discuss your CBD use with your doctor.

Unless your doctor recommends a specific dose, start by taking 10 to 20 mg a day. Take this for a week to ensure that it is well-tolerated and that you don’t experience any unwanted effects or an allergic reaction.

How to Take CBD

If this dose does not have the desired effect, try increasing in increments of 5mg each week until the desired amount is reached.

Other CBD products are not FDA regulated and do not have officially recommended dosages. This can make it difficult to determine how much you might need, but there are some things you can consider that might help.