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cbd cause stroke

Common effects of stroke that people can find difficult to cope with include pain, muscle problems and headaches.

But can they help stroke survivors?

If people with certain conditions, like MS-related muscle spasticity or severe epilepsy, find other treatments aren’t working for them, cannabis-based products can be given by doctors.

At the moment, cannabis products are not prescribed for chronic pain or headaches. It is possible that more research will discover the benefits of CBD or other cannabis products for stroke survivors in future, but at the moment not enough is known about it. If you decide to try CBD oil products, be aware that the quality of cannabis-based products you can buy in shops can vary. So before you spend your money, make sure you find out what you are actually buying.

It is critically important to identify all factors that may play a role in the recent increase of the incidence of stroke among the young population. Considering the worldwide use of cannabinoids (cannabis and synthetic cannabinoids), the recent legalization of their consumption in some countries, and their supposed involvement in cardiovascular events, we evaluated their role in the occurrence of neurovascular complications among the young. Ninety-eight patients were described in the literature as having a cannabinoids-related stroke (85 after cannabis use and 13 after synthetic cannabinoids). The distribution by type of stroke was as follows: 4 patients with an undetermined type of stroke, 85 with an ischemic stroke and/or a transient ischemic attack, and 9 with a hemorrhagic stroke. The mean age of patients was 32.3±11.8years (range 15-63), and the majority of them were male with a sex ratio of 3.7:1. Cannabis was often smoked with tobacco in 66% of cases. Most of the patients with cannabinoids-related strokes were chronic cannabis users in 81% of cases, and for 18% of them, there was a recent increase of the amount of cannabis consumption during the days before the occurrence of stroke. Even if the prognosis of stroke was globally favorable in 46% of cases, with no or few sequelae, 5 patients died after the neurovascular event. One striking element reported in the majority of the reports was a temporal relationship between cannabinoids use, whether natural or synthetic, and the occurrence of stroke. However, a temporal correlation does not mean causation, and other factors may be involved. Cannabis may be considered as a risk factor of stroke until research shows evidence of an underlying mechanism that, alone or in association with others, contributes to the development of stroke. As of today, reversible cerebral vasoconstriction triggered by cannabinoids use may be a convincing mechanism of stroke in 27% of cases. Indeed, despite the widespread use of cannabinoids, the low frequency of neurovascular complications after their use may be due to a genetic predisposition to their neurovascular toxicity in some individuals. Further studies should focus on this point. More importantly however, this low frequency may be underestimated because the drug consumption may not be systematically researched, neither by questioning nor by laboratory screening. Besides this vascular role of cannabinoids in the occurrence of stroke, a cellular effect of cannabis on brain mitochondria was recently suggested in an experimental study. One of the mechanisms involved in young cannabis users with stroke may be the generation of reactive oxygen species leading to an oxidative stress, which is a known mechanism in stroke in humans. It is useful to inform the young population about the real potential risk of using cannabinoids. We suggest to systematically ask all young adults with stroke about their drug consumption including cannabinoids, to screen urine for cannabis or to include a specific diagnostic test to detect synthetic cannabinoids, and to obtain non-invasive intracranial arterial investigations (i.e. CT-angiography or cerebral MRA) in order to search for cerebral vasoconstriction. However, several questions remained unresolved and further research is still needed to assess the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in young cannabinoids users with stroke. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled “Cannabinoids and Epilepsy”.

Keywords: Cannabis; Marijuana; Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome; Spice; Stroke; Synthetic cannabinoids.

Other evidence for the association comes from population studies, where statistical analyses were performed to see whether cannabis users are more likely to have ischemic strokes than the normal population. These have brought back mixed results.

But a new study from the University of Mississippi found no evidence for the supposed connection; adding to the research suggesting that cannabis is not an independent risk factor for ischemic stroke.

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The researchers point out that this result may be different from other studies because they did not include patients who used other drugs associated with stroke risk like cocaine and methamphetamines, and they controlled for cigarette smoking. Often those who use these substances are more likely to also use cannabis, which could confuse the data, making it seem like cannabis is causing the stroke risk when it is actually being caused by other drugs.

Cannabis is becoming increasingly popular as more and more states allow for its legal use. But many worry about potential side effects and long term consequences of using this medicinal and recreational substance. One serious area for concern is the possibility that cannabis may increase the risk for ischemic stroke. While the research on this has been minimal, some case studies and population studies have indicated that cannabis use could be tied to an increased risk factor for ischemic stroke – while other researchers suggest that the tie disappears when other factors are taken into consideration.

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Study finds no association with cannabis and ischemic stroke, in contrast with earlier studies.