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cbd appetite suppressant

Cbd appetite suppressant

As far as weight loss goes, THCV has been studied to reduce appetite by way of inhibiting CB1 receptors. Another study found it effective for weight loss, noting “our findings are the first to show that treatment with the CB1 neutral antagonist THCV decreases resting-state functional connectivity. and increases connectivity in the cognitive control network and dorsal visual stream network. This effect profile suggests the possible therapeutic activity of THCV for obesity, where functional connectivity has been found to be altered in these regions.” This makes it clear the effects of THCV for appetite suppression have nothing to do with counteracting marijuana usage; it’s being studied on its own, for use in weight loss.

Should the cannabis industry be getting in bed with diet culture?

While the euphoria and focus THCV products claim to promote are unproven, according to science, the appetite suppression is real. However, should the cannabis industry be getting in bed with diet culture? Why do we need to complicate humanity's already very complex relationship with the size of our bodies with low-stakes recreational drugs?

My Experience With THCV

Though it isn’t marketed as an anti-inflammatory, THCV has been proven to function in that capacity, including reducing pain stemming from inflammation. It’s also been shown to be neuroprotective and potentially useful for symptoms of conditions like Parkinson’s Disease and epilepsy.

In a culture rife with problematic dieting, is it the place of specialty cannabinoid companies to promote food restriction and weight loss? Or is THCV harmlessly offering respite from “the munchies,” operating under the presumption anyone taking it is also smoking marijuana? And lastly, is there merit to THCV outside of appetite suppression brands could be focusing on instead? Let’s examine.

The Moral Issue

At high doses in potent strains, THCV will produce psychoactive effects that are generally stimulating and promote mental clarity.

I find it harmful for cannabis companies to be highlighting appetite suppression as a selling point feature of THCV. Since it’s well proven to relieve pain and inflammation, it isn’t as if they have nothing else to stake a claim about. Diseases stemming from chronic inflammation are the world’s most significant causes of death.

Cbd appetite suppressant

How? Because CBD can improve your overall mood — with initial research suggesting that CBD might be a good treatment for anxiety, panic disorder, social anxiety, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and even post-traumatic stress disorder — as your general mental health and sense of wellbeing improves, you’re far more likely to hit the gym. Motivation is a critical factor in whether or not many people reach their fitness goals, which is why supplementing with CBD might give you the boost you need to actually do your workout and stick to your fitness plan.

This means if chronic pain has been preventing you from being able to exercise, CBD may provide you much-needed relief to restart your fitness journey, which in turn can help with weight loss.

Improved mood

While a direct link between CBD usage and weight loss is still being researched, there are a few ways that CBD oil might be effective in supporting weight loss.

If you’re ready to incorporate CBD into your fitness routine, Dr. Dawson recommends starting with an organic or Clean Green Certified product that is third-party tested. She suggests using broad or full-spectrum CBD to get better results at a lower dose — especially when compared to an isolate.

Boosting the metabolism

“If you want to absorb as much as you can from an oil, consume it after a meal containing fat post-workout. If you want to consume before the workout, a tablespoon of coconut oil may help you absorb more of it,” Dr. Dawson says. “If you want to inhale it, I recommend an electronic vaporizer made for dry herb before or after the activity. An ethanol-based tincture can be held under the tongue and can be used before or after the activity.”

He did exhaustive research. He found there’d been decades of scientific studies on the effects of THC and CBD on cells and animals, but few trials with humans, because the FDA classifies cannabis and all its components as Schedule 1 drugs, which have “no accepted medical treatment use.” It took Sue Sisley, an Arizona physician, seven years of struggling with bureaucratic hurdles before she received the first FDA approval for a study, just beginning, of marijuana with vets who have PTSD.

I’d been hearing about the healing properties of CBD for years, but I had not heard that it cuts your appetite until I spent time with Dr. Allan Frankel, a renowned internist in Los Angeles who’s one of the country’s pioneers in “dosed cannabis medicine.”

This strains credulity. How could one plant substance heal brain damage, seizures, MG, Parkinson’s, cancer, migraines, anxiety, panic attacks, uterine fibroids, tinnitus, and a long list of other conditions—attested to not only by Frankel but research scientists in many countries?

By contrast, products sold at dispensaries may be labeled, “13% THC,” but they don’t say how many milligrams you get per puff or drop or bite. Frankel says, “What the hell is medicine if you don’t know what’s in it?”

They go to a dispensary, ask what’s good for migraines or whatever ails them, and the bud tender, a low-wage worker with no medical training, offers what often turns out to be bad advice. Misinformation is rampant, and most people have no clue how to use it.

Frankel puts his hand on his heart. “Imagine the pressure!” he says. A complex soul, whose parents survived the Holocaust, Frankel says that when his patients don’t get better, he’s sad and disappointed, and starts to question if he’s wasting people’s time and money. “But then ten people will get better, and I feel… grateful. It makes me confident I’m on the right road, on the right side of history.”

Frankel had rarely tried cannabis until he was 49. He was a partner in one of the most successful practices in West Los Angeles and a clinical professor at UCLA Medical School. He’d been my family’s internist for 15 years, and I found him a skilled diagnostician, who listened carefully, and who cared. He had to quit practicing in 2000, after he’d suffered a disabling back injury, then developed a viral infection of the heart and was told he had six months to live. Some of his cancer and AIDS patients urged him to try cannabis. “They did a reverse intervention,” he said, and a year later, his heart was normal. He can’t be certain how or if cannabis healed his heart. “I’d been depressed and CBD stopped the depression,” he said. “It gave me something to look forward to. My brain was turned on.”

Frankel runs GreenBridge Medical, which he founded in 2006, like an internist’s office. He begins with a one-hour consult, comes up with a treatment plan, and recommends products for which he designed the formulas: ten oils with different combinations of THC and CBD. (THC gets you high; CBD doesn’t, but is alleged to have strong healing properties) The #1 oil is almost all CBD, #10 is almost all THC, and #5 has equal amounts of both. So the doctor, patient, and dispensary know how many milligrams of what chemicals the patient is taking, and the doctor can adjust the dose as needed.

During a day at his office, I saw three patients who’d had success with CBD. The first was Sawyer Maddox, five, from Atlanta, who’d been diagnosed at three with a rare form of epilepsy, Doose Syndrome, which is resistant to medication. He was having more than 200 seizures a day, where he’d drop face first on the floor. His parents fitted him with a catcher’s mask for protection, and carpeted their home with foam to cushion his falls. The pediatric neurologist they saw in Atlanta gave him meds that made things worse. Desperate, the Maddoxes, a conservative Baptist family, flew to California to see Frankel. He started Sawyer on #1 oil, and three months later, the boy was seizure free.