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If you use CBD regularly and you’re getting ready to travel, you probably want to know if you can fly with CBD. What are the rules? While some CBD products are now legal, what will happen if you carry them on a plane? Your access to this site has been limited by the site owner If you think you have been blocked in error, contact the owner of this site for assistance. If you are a WordPress user with

Can I Fly With CBD?

If you use CBD regularly and you’re getting ready to travel, you probably want to know if you can fly with CBD. What are the rules? Which type of CBD is best to fly with?

Good News: the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) has already commented positively on the legality of flying with CBD oil. (More on this below.)

If you fly with CBD within the U.S., the rules are pretty simple. If you fly with CBD internationally, the rules are not so simple.

Here are all the answers to any concerns you may have about flying with CBD.

Yes, You Can Fly with CBD in the US

There are a few exceptions we’ll get into further in this post, but the reality is that yes, you can fly throughout the US with CBD.

The TSA says as much on their website :

“ Marijuana and certain cannabis infused products, including some Cannabidiol (CBD) oil, remain illegal under federal law except for products that contain no more than 0.3% THC on a dry weight basis or that are approved by FDA.”

Here’s what that means:

Cannabidiol (CBD) oil, including the full-spectrum hemp oil products sold by Green Lotus, must contain less than 0.3% Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). That’s the chemical in marijuana that produces the “high” sensation. Any level under 0.3% is generally too low for a person to feel.

Any such products can legally be carried through the TSA screenings you’ll find at US airports.

There are other considerations, though, if you want to fly internationally.

When Did The Law Change?

If you’re assuming that it’s still illegal to fly with CBD, that’s because the law only recently changed. In December 2018, Congress passed the Farm Bill , which legalized the sale of CBD derived from hemp, as long as the THC level is below that 0.3%.

However, the TSA didn’t comment directly until 2019. That’s when they updated their policy to clarify that yes, you can bring CBD on carry-on or checked luggage.

It’s Legal to Fly with CBD, But You May Get Hassled

In 2019, the government agency announced: “ TSA officers DO NOT search for marijuana or other illegal drugs … But in the event a substance appears to be marijuana or a cannabis infused product, we’re required by federal law to notify law enforcement.”

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The TSA says it’s legal, and TSA agents should know the law. But what happens when a lot of people should know something? Some of them don’t. So it’s best to be prepared for a little extra scrutiny from the agent and officer who missed orientation.

Want to fly with CBD and not get hassled? Fly with the right kind of CBD. (Keep on reading)

Some CBD Products are a Better Choice than Others

First, no CBD pre-roll joints. It’s a joint: pungent green flower wrapped in rice paper and twisted on the end. Try explaining the botanical paradox of hemp and marijuana to someone who is very tired and very underpaid.

CBD Gummies and CBD Capsules , on the other hand, are a good travel option. They’re not liquid, which the TSA is notoriously strict about.

Also, make sure to keep products in their original packaging. That way, if a curious TSA agent does happen to stop you, you’ll be able to clearly and easily identify what you’re carrying.

Don’t Fly with CBD Internationally

Every country has different regulations. CBD is banned in many places, from Belarus to Bolivia. And several that allow you to fly with CBD have THC level requirements that don’t match the US’s 0.3%. General EU law requires consumable CBD to have a level below 0.2%, but some European countries go even further. Norway and France, for example, permit only CBD isolate, meaning a THC level of 0%.

That’s why we recommend leaving CBD at home if you’re planning to fly out of the United States.

Unfortunately, you may not even be safe if you’re flying into the US. In May of 2019, a 71-year-old grandmother heading home from Mexico and passing through Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport was arrested for traveling with CBD oil and given a felony drug charge. She spent two nights in the DFW airport jail. At the time, customs officials said laws permitting CBD were still in the process of being implemented.

That shouldn’t happen to you now, in 2021. But again, just because something is legal doesn’t mean TSA agents and customs officials won’t give you a hard time. And we wouldn’t want that.

Is CBD Safe to Carry on a Plane?

Nov. 26, 2019 — Many air travelers who struggle with anxiety and jet lag have turned to CBD as a remedy, even as researchers are still investigating whether it works. Other travelers like to tote along CBD in skin care or beauty products.

But many also wonder: Will my CBD get past the Transportation Security Administration (TSA)?

Earlier this year, officials arrested a 71-year-old woman at the Dallas/Fort-Worth International Airport in May after finding CBD oil in a carry-on. She spent two nights in jail.

While the TSA recently loosened up its regulations around CBD products, the answer is still: It depends.

Marijuana and certain cannabis-infused products including cannabidiol (CBD) oil are still illegal under federal law and won’t make it through government screening, says Carrie Harmon, a TSA spokesperson. But CBD products made from hemp, which contain no more than 0.3% THC, are legal under the Farm Bill of 2018. THC is the component in marijuana that produces a “high.”

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In addition, the FDA recently warned companies that adding CBD to foods or dietary supplements is illegal because it has not been declared to be GRAS, or generally recognized as safe.

The TSA’s updated regulations allow passengers to legally bring these products on board:

  • Medical marijuana
  • Products that contain no more than 0.3% THC
  • FDA-approved products. The only one currently approved is Epidiolex (cannabidiol), which treats two rare and severe forms of epilepsy.

At the Airport

Once at the TSA checkpoint, what can CBD-toting travelers expect? According to the TSA, screening is focused on security and protecting passenger safety. “TSA security officers don’t search for marijuana or cannabis-infused products. However, in the event a substance that appears illegal is discovered during security screening, TSA officers will refer the matter to law enforcement. Law enforcement officers then follow their own procedures.”

And no, there won’t be a TSA dog sniffing your luggage or purse. “TSA K9s only search for explosives and explosive components,” Harmon says.

Who gets the final word? The TSA website posts: The final decision rests with the TSA officer on whether an item is allowed through the checkpoint.

The other complicating factor is that some states may have more restrictive laws regarding CBD. In Virginia, for example, you can only purchase CBD with a prescription. And CBD of any type is not allowed in dietary supplements or food, the FDA says.

Here’s what experts suggest:

If you are traveling with medical marijuana or an FDA-approved drug, take your prescription with you in case there are any questions. Keep the marijuana and the prescription drug in original packaging.

If you have CBD products, find the product’s certificate of analysis, or CoA.

CoAs are listed on manufacturer’s websites. Or, once the product is purchased, the QR code on the label should be scannable, taking customers to the product’s webpage and the CoA. A CoA will list the percent of CBD and other cannabinoids, when it was tested, and the name of the lab that tested it (outside labs are preferred to company testing, experts say.)

“Print a copy of the certificate of analysis (or CoA) of the CBD product you are carrying so you have formal documentation of what that product is,” says Alex Wolfe, vice-president of business development for ShopCBD.com, an online specialty store representing 32 companies that sell hemp-derived products.

“Any good brand should be able to show you the CoA,” agrees Gary Avetisyan, who is co-owner of two Topikal stores in the Los Angeles area selling CBD products. That way, he says, it will be clear there is no THC or it is below the required 0.3%.

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Besides packing the CoA, ”print out the latest regulations that TSA has posted, or have the link to the latest regulations on your phone,” Wolfe suggests. That way, if you encounter a new TSA agent or one unfamiliar with all the regulations, you have support.

Other Options

If the anxiety of wondering whether you will get through TSA with your CBD is too overwhelming, it might be better to check out whether it’s legal at your destination and simply buy it there. One source for state laws on marijuana, CBD, and hemp is norml.org.

Another option is to shop online or at a store before the trip, then ship the CBD to your destination, Avetisyan says.

Los Angeles attorney Griffen Thorne, who is familiar with cannabis issues, urges passengers to be cautious. He recommends not taking CBD on international flights.

“The laws in the jurisdiction you are flying to can be drastically different. Flying domestically with a CBD product is obviously less of a risk, but I still think there are risks.” Not everyone is up to date on the new TSA stance, he says. Hemp is not a controlled substance federally, he says, but people transporting it across state lines get pulled over. Law enforcement officials are not all familiar with the differences between hemp-derived CBD and cannabis-derived CBD.

As for marijuana, medical or recreational, the best advice, he says, is ”leave it all at home” if you’re flying, since it remains a Schedule I drug on the federal level.

Show Sources

Carrie Harmon, TSA spokesperson.

TSA: “Medical Marijuana.”

Gary Avetisyan, co-owner, Topikal CBD, Los Angeles.

Alex Wolfe, spokesperson, ShopCBD.com.

NBCDFW.com: “Traveling Grandmother Jailed for CBD Oil: ‘I Slept on the Floor… Next to the Toilet.’”

Citizen Truth: “What is a CBD Certificate of Analysis (COA) (And How to Read It).”

Marijuana Policy Project.

TravelLatte: “Traveling with CBD.”

Brookings: “The Farm Bill, hemp legalization and the status of CBD: An explainer.”

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