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can cbd help high blood pressure

Can cbd help high blood pressure

When you visit the doctor, you’ll usually hear your blood pressure described by two numbers, like 120/70.

Lowering High Blood Pressure: CBD and Blood Pressure

Many of the cannabidiol products you’ll see in CBD stores or online are of lower quality, since – as with any product – it’s more expensive to produce high-end merchandise and it sells for a higher price, often with lower profit margins for the vendors.

CBD Improves Sleep

Sarah Polansky, owner and developer of the CBD brand Prismatic Plants, told Public Goods that “The more you take CBD and help to regulate your adrenals, the less likely you’ll feel fatigued as your body returns to a state of balance rather than constant stress.”

Can cbd help high blood pressure

During an initial visit, subjects were familiarized with the stress tests and with noninvasive cardiovascular (CVS) monitoring, and an electrocardiogram (ECG) was done to rule out any preexisting cardiac conditions. Subjects were advised to fast overnight, to avoid beverages containing caffeine or alcohol, and to avoid strenuous exercise for 24 hours before each of the 2 study visits. Two hours after CBD/placebo was administered, subjects performed various stress tests (36). Noninvasive cardiovascular monitoring using Finometer and laser Doppler flowmetry was carried out during the 2 hours to assess changes in baseline parameters and during the stress test periods.

Cannabinoids (CBs) are compounds that bind to CB receptors or are structurally similar to compounds that bind to CB receptors. They include endogenously produced compounds (called endocannabinoids), synthetic compounds and phytocannabinoids obtained from the Cannabis sativa plant. There are over 80 known types of phytocannabinoids, the most widely studied of which is Δ 9 tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ 9 -THC or THC), which is responsible for the psychoactive properties of cannabis (4). The other major phytocannabinoid is cannabidiol (CBD), which does not have psychoactive properties. CBD is currently the focus of much research due to its potential in a number of therapeutic areas, as it has been shown to have antiinflammatory, anticonvulsant, antioxidant, anxiolytic, antinausea, and antipsychotic properties (5). A number of preclinical studies have also shown beneficial effects of CBD in a range of disorders of the cardiovascular system (6). A CBD/THC combination (Sativex/Nabiximols, GW Pharmaceuticals) is licensed for the treatment of spasticity in multiple sclerosis, and CBD alone (Epidiolex, GW Pharmaceuticals) has entered an expanded access program in children with intractable epilepsies (Dravet syndrome and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome). Epidiolex has also received orphan designation status for the treatment of neonatal hypoxia-ischaemic encephalopathy.

METHODS. Nine healthy male volunteers were given 600 mg of CBD or placebo in a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, crossover study. Cardiovascular parameters were monitored using a finometer and laser Doppler.

THC, the major psychoactive component of cannabis, is known to cause tachycardia and orthostatic hypotension in humans (20), a hemodynamic response similar to that observed to CBD in the present study. THC is a partial agonist at both CB1 and CB2 receptors (21), and the effects of THC on heart rate are mediated through CB1 receptors (20). CBD does not bind with any great affinity to CB1, but it can interact indirectly by augmenting CB1 receptors’ constitutional activity or endocannabinoid tone, the so called indirect agonism (22). We recently showed that CBD also causes endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation in isolated human mesenteric arteries through CB1 activation (11). Therefore, it is possible that the changes in hemodynamics brought about by CBD are mediated through CB1.

Statistics.

The effects of placebo (closed square) and CBD (open square) on systolic blood pressure (SBP) (A), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) (B), mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) (C), heart rate (HR) (D), stroke volume (SV) (E), cardiac output (CO) (F), ejection time (EJT) (G), total peripheral resistance (TPR) (H), and forearm blood flow (I), measured continuously just before, during, and after mental arithmetic test (dotted line denotes stress test period), except for forearm blood flow. Measurements for forearm blood flow were made over a 2-minute window just before, during, and after the stress test. Repeated measures 2-way ANOVA; mean ± SEM (+ and # denote significant change in a parameter during the stress period seen with placebo and CBD, respectively). + / # P < 0.05, ++ /# # P < 0.01.

The effects of placebo (closed square) and CBD (open square) on systolic blood pressure (SBP) (A), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) (B), mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) (C), heart rate (HR) (D), stroke volume (SV) (E), cardiac output (CO) (F), ejection time (EJT) (G), total peripheral resistance (TPR) (H), and forearm blood flow (I), measured continuously just before, during, and after isometric exercise test (dotted line denotes stress test period), except for forearm blood flow. Measurements for forearm blood flow were made over a 2-minute window just before, during, and after the stress test. Repeated measures 2-way ANOVA; mean ± SEM (*/ + / # P < 0.05; **/ ++ / ## P < 0.01; ***/ ### P < 0.001; ****/ #### P < 0.0001 using Bonferroni post-hoc analysis; + and # denote significant change in a parameter during the stress period seen with placebo and CBD respectively).

The study was a randomized, crossover design with each subject given CBD (BN: K12067A) or placebo (both gifts from GW Pharmaceuticals) in a capsule in a double-blind fashion, with a minimum time interval of at least 48 hours (range 3–16 days), taking place at the Division of Medical Sciences, School of Medicine, Royal Derby Hospital. Allocation was decided by a coin toss, and block randomization was employed by S.E. O’Sullivan, who assigned participants. K.A. Jadoon carried out all study visits, and data analysis was blinded.

Introduction

The cold pressor test caused a significant rise in TPR (as expected) in the placebo group only ( Figure 5H ; P < 0.01) and rise in forearm skin blood flow with both CBD and placebo ( Figure 5I ; P < 0.05). The overall trend was for lower TPR and forearm skin blood flow in those who had taken CBD, with post-hoc analysis showing a reduction in both just before and in the latter half of cold stress ( Figure 5H [P < 0.05 to < 0.0001] and Figure 5I [P < 0.001]).

1 Division of Medical Sciences & Graduate Entry Medicine, University of Nottingham, Royal Derby Hospital Centre, Derby, United Kingdom.